The Future of Lying

Jeff Hancock on the AARP Washington State “Sorting Fact From Fiction” speaker series.

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Artificial intelligence is changing the way we communicate with each other, leading to questions of trust and bias, HAI

In “AI-Mediated Communication: Definition, Research Agenda, and Ethical Considerations,” published in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication in January, Jeff Hancock and two Cornell colleagues reflect on what happens when AI tools come between people and act on their behalf, from how wording suggestions could alter our use of language and bake in bias, to the impact these communications could have on relationships and trust. 

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When Gen Z is the source of the misinformation it consumes, Politico

Angela Lee, a SML Ph.D. candidate who studies the psychology of young people’s interactions with technology, says Gen Zers are generally very apt at being able to trace the origins of stories or discern the authenticity of a viral story line.

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How Mis- And Disinformation Campaigns Online Kneecap Coronavirus Response, Kaiser Health News

Older Americans experience a “perfect storm,” Hancock said. “They’re more susceptible to the virus. They are targets of misinformation and online scams at a much higher rate than regular folks are.”

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Can you catch coronavirus swimming? What about 5G? Debunking bizarre myths, San Francisco Chronicle

Jeff Hancock has studied the propagation of conspiracy theories and myths and notes that the effective ones are all attributed to a “reliable source” — a friend who is a doctor, or high up in the military, for example.

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Work and a desire to exercise, socialize are why people didn’t social distance, Stanford News

Maintaining social distance has been crucial in slowing the spread of novel coronavirus infections, yet some people did not follow early recommendations to limit physical contact with others. Now, a new study by Stanford scholars reveals reasons why people failed to comply.

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How to talk about coronavirus misinformation with the older people in your life, Mashable

According to Jeff Hancock, older people are particularly targeted for misinformation because they tend to have more money, more civic engagement, more free time, and less experience with technology.

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How to Be Intentional About Consuming Coronavirus News, Greater Good Magazine

Researchers and media experts weigh in on how to stay informed about coronavirus while protecting your mental health.

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Social media giants face balancing act for tackling coronavirus misinformation, S&P Global

SML research found that much of coronavirus misinformation spreads through private messaging channels, making it more difficult for social media companies to weed out false information while also protecting user privacy.

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People’s uncertainty about the novel coronavirus can lead them to believe misinformation, Stanford News

Check health-related information about the coronavirus from established news sources rather than from shared stories in social media, advises Prof. Jeff Hancock.

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Social media and virtual social gatherings can help us navigate the Coronavirus crisis

In TIME and The Atlantic articles, Prof. Jeff Hancock discusses the impact of social media during the crisis and the benefits of virtual meals with friends.

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Search results not biased along party lines, SML scholars find

“Our data suggest that Google’s search algorithm is not biased along political lines, but instead emphasizes authoritative sources,” said Jeff Hancock.

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Folk Theories of AI Systems Research Project wins a 2019 HAI Seed Grant

Jeff Hancock (SML), Michael Bernstein (Computer Science), Sunny Xun Liu (SML), and Danae Metaxa (Computer Science) win grant from the Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Initiative.

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Anger Can Be Contagious – Here’s How To Stop The Spread, NPR

Jeff Hancock’s research suggests we can pick up on — and mirror — the emotions we encounter in our social media feeds.

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Social Robots and Deception

Jeff Hancock on the American Psychological Association “Speaking of Psychology” podcast.

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Big little lies of mobile dating, Stanford News

Lying about availability is a common deception mobile app daters tell their potential partners, according to a new paper by two SML researchers.

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Your phone really does make you feel good, study says, CNET

SML researchers contend that you’re not necessarily addicted if you need to be with your phone all the time.

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You Don’t Know What You’ve Got ‘Til It’s Gone, Behavioral Scientist

SML researchers David Markowitz and Jeff Hancock discuss their recent studies on the effects of taking away smartphones. When people cannot use technology to connect with one another, to stay informed, and to entertain themselves, they may lose out on important psychological benefits.

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Capturing the Sound of Depression in the Human Voice, KQED

Adam Miner says there are risks in oversimplifying the complexity of medical diagnoses.

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Scholars discuss the benefits and risks of using talking software to address mental health, Stanford News

Adam Miner, Arnold Milstein and Jeff Hancock discuss how technological advances now offer the capability for patients to have personal health discussions with devices like smartphones and digital assistants

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