How Mis- And Disinformation Campaigns Online Kneecap Coronavirus Response, Kaiser Health News

Older Americans experience a “perfect storm,” Hancock said. “They’re more susceptible to the virus. They are targets of misinformation and online scams at a much higher rate than regular folks are.”

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Can you catch coronavirus swimming? What about 5G? Debunking bizarre myths, San Francisco Chronicle

Jeff Hancock has studied the propagation of conspiracy theories and myths and notes that the effective ones are all attributed to a “reliable source” — a friend who is a doctor, or high up in the military, for example.

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Chatbots in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, npj Digital Medicine

Chatbots, if effectively designed and deployed, could help us by sharing up-to-date information quickly, encouraging desired health impacting behaviors, and lessening the psychological damage caused by fear and isolation.

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Nearly one-third of Americans believe a coronavirus vaccine exists and is being withheld, survey finds, USA Today

As the coronavirus pandemic nears 50,000 deaths in the U.S. – around half don’t believe that figure either – new data suggests many Americans hold misinformation about the virus.

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Work and a desire to exercise, socialize are why people didn’t social distance, Stanford News

Maintaining social distance has been crucial in slowing the spread of novel coronavirus infections, yet some people did not follow early recommendations to limit physical contact with others. Now, a new study by Stanford scholars reveals reasons why people failed to comply.

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How to talk about coronavirus misinformation with the older people in your life, Mashable

According to Jeff Hancock, older people are particularly targeted for misinformation because they tend to have more money, more civic engagement, more free time, and less experience with technology.

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How to Be Intentional About Consuming Coronavirus News, Greater Good Magazine

Researchers and media experts weigh in on how to stay informed about coronavirus while protecting your mental health.

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Take the Stanford Coronavirus Study survey

We are a group of Stanford University researchers studying the impact of COVID-19 on our communities. Research is conducted in collaboration with the Stanford Department of Epidemiology & Population Health , Stanford Department of Dermatology, the Stanford Social Media Lab and the Center for Population Health Sciences.

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Stocking the Social Pantry: How we to connect with others when we are stuck at home (and why it’s important)

The Bay Area of California — where we both currently live — is under orders to “shelter in place.” This is a more strict form of social distancing, which we both agree is a terrible term because it conflates “social” with “physical proximity.” As online communication researchers, we know there are many ways to be social while still physically separated.

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Doubly disadvantaged? Older adults, social technologies, and the coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus is here and the situation is changing by the hour. Amidst all the breaking news, one piece of information about the coronavirus has been consistent and unchanging: older adults, particularly those over the age of 80, are most at-risk.

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Social media giants face balancing act for tackling coronavirus misinformation, S&P Global

SML research found that much of coronavirus misinformation spreads through private messaging channels, making it more difficult for social media companies to weed out false information while also protecting user privacy.

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People’s uncertainty about the novel coronavirus can lead them to believe misinformation, Stanford News

Check health-related information about the coronavirus from established news sources rather than from shared stories in social media, advises Prof. Jeff Hancock.

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Social media and virtual social gatherings can help us navigate the Coronavirus crisis

In TIME and The Atlantic articles, Prof. Jeff Hancock discusses the impact of social media during the crisis and the benefits of virtual meals with friends.

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Quality time, online: Staying connected with social technologies during the coronavirus outbreak

As the novel respiratory virus COVID-19 spreads throughout numerous countries, governments and public healthcare systems are working tirelessly to contain the disease. In many places like Stanford, this includes implementing social distancing policies – urging people to avoid large gatherings, to work from home when possible, and to limit contact with others to minimize the spread of the disease. (For more on this, check out “Flatten the Curve”).

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