Stanford Social Media Lab research is supported by the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, the Knight Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

Attributional dynamics of smartphone use

Why do people believe the phone is additive? In this project. one of our primary research questions is whether beliefs that the mobile phone is addictive is rooted not only people’s own experience with the phone.

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“Silvers” and technology

The goal of this research program is to better understand what adults over 65, “silvers,” think and feel about technology, how they engage with potentially harmful content online, and how we might be able to leverage the wisdom and experience of this population to empower them in their use of new technologies.

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Political search media

In a recent and ongoing project on political search media, we collect and analyze data from search engines’ results pages for queries related to political issues, such as the names of political candidates running for office.

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Social media mindsets

Is using social media helpful or harmful to your well-being? Our research suggests the answer may be a matter of mindset.

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AI mediated communication

AI-MC is mediated communication between people in which a computational agent operates on behalf of a communicator by modifying, augmenting, or generating messages to accomplish communication or interpersonal goals.

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Social robots as media

Robots are poised to play an important role in social life. Surprisingly, to date we know surprisingly little about the psychological, social or emotional responses to robots.

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Folk theory of cyber-social systems

People’s beliefs and behaviors are shaped by their understanding of how systems work, also known as folk theories. These systems include social systems, such as understanding the behavior of others, physical systems, such as gravity, as well as cyber-social systems, that have both social and digital components.

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Truth, trust, and technology

We investigate how people lie and detect deception with technology. Our research suggests that lies are not more prevalent online than offline (see Guillory & Hancock, 2012; Markowitz & Hancock, 2016), but instead, deception is represented differently when technology is involved.

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Fake news and language

This project revolves around fake news, discusses the differences between distorted/ dishonest misinformation and blatantly deceptive news, and investigates language features of dishonest political news articles from the psychological aspects.

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Language and social dynamics

What do words suggest about people and their experiences? We use language as a lens into psychological events and social interactions. Our approach uses computational tools to gather and examine language data, from online reviews to science papers.

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